Top 5 Edinburgh Ghost Adventures – Haunted House, Movie Theatre, Towers, Dancehall and Dungeons

Top 5 Edinburgh Ghost Adventures – Haunted House, Movie Theatre, Towers, Dancehall and Dungeons


Hello friends and welcome to this, your guide
to the most haunted, horrifying and downright hellish places on earth.
In these videos we talk you through some of the spookiest tales and urban legends from
towns and cities across the world, and today we’re going to be exploring 6 of the most
horrifying haunts in the Big Smoke, London, England 1. Edinburgh Castle
Arguably Edinburgh’s most famous sight, the royal castle has stood in the city since
the 12th century and has witnessed many a conflict through the years, so understandably
it comes with a plethora of paranormal reports surrounding it.
One of the castle’s most famous spooks is the Ghostly Piper who was reportedly sent
into the tunnels underneath the castle a few hundred years ago to explore but never returned.
Ever since, there’s been reports of unseen bagpipes playing below the castle and around
the city’s famous “royal mile”. Of course, the castles dungeons also have
their own share of supernatural entities owing to the litany of prisoners who were tortured
and killed whilst imprisoned at the castle in the past. One of these prisoners, who attempted
to escape in a wheelbarrow full of manure, allegedly haunts the battlement and has even
been said to attempt to push visitors down Castle Rock. People can usually avoid the
ghosts attacks though as he reported to give off a foul smell before he appears. 2. West Bow
The West Bow between Victoria Street and the Grassmarket, was once home to Major Thomas
Weir, known as the Wizard of West Bow, and was the most feared house in the city. The
enigmatic Weir was executed in 1670 following multiple convictions including bestiality,
incest and necromancy. The house lay empty on after his death but
locals swore the windows were often illuminated at night, and passed over by ominous shadows
with unsettling music emanating from the building. Reportedly, on more than one occasion an infernal
carriage was witnessed outside the abandoned house, being drawn by 6 fiery horses.
Although it was thought the house was demolished in 1878, it was recently discovered that parts
of the structure survived and are now incorporated into the Quaker meeting house on Victoria
Terrace. It’s precisely because of the haunted bones
of that old house, lingering still in the shell of another building, that hauntings
are still reported to this day in this lively district of Edinburgh. 3. Brodie’s Close
William Brodie is often compared to Thomas Weir by those familiar with the occult underbelly
of Edinburgh society. Brodie, much like Weir, was a well respected cabinet maker and deacon
of a trades-guild however, AGAIN like Weir, he led a wicked and gruesome hidden life which
started when he copied the keys to a bank. Brodie would go on to steal hundreds of pounds
from the bank which he would go on to spend supporting his family (quite noble) and his
5 seperate mistresses (no quite so noble). Brody managed to keep his lives secret for
several years but his pernicious side business was eventually tipped off to the police, and
William tried to make his escape before the authorities came for him. He fled as far as
Amsterdam before being caught and extradited to the UK where he was found overwhelmingly
guilty and sentenced to death by hanging. It’s alleged that Brody tried to survive
his hanging by bribing the executioner and using his carpentry skills to tamper with
the scaffold but if he DID try this, it didn’t work and he was executed as planned. Soon
after his body was committed to the earth, the sightings of his lingering spirit began
to come in, particularly around his workshop and family home in Brodie’s Close, sightings
which persist to this day. Many of the sightings claim he is accompanied
by a flaming horse, possibly linking him to the ghostly cavalcade that appears in West
Bow 4. Edinburgh Playhouse
The Playhouse opened more than 80 years ago, originally as a cinema and is now the largest
working theatre in the entire UK. Unsurprisingly, seeing as it’s an old theatre, it has it’ve
very own ghost. Affectionately known as Albert by the staff, this spectre appears always
on the 6th floor, garbed in all grey and accompanied by a chillin drop in temperature.
Although “Albert”s true identity is unknown, the two most popular theories are that he
was either a stage hand who dies in a tragic accident, or more morbidly, he was a night
watchman who took his own life. 5. GreyFriars Kirkyard
Found looming over the southern edge of the Old Town distrit, Greyfriars Kirkyard was
established in 1562 and has been regarded as the most haunted place in the city basically
ever since. From the moment the first soul was put to
rest here in the 16th century a number of notable people have been buried here including
James Stirling, Allan Ramsay and Harry Munro. Among the famous residents is Greyfriar Bobby,
a dog beloved by the city and known for holding a loyal vigil over the grave of his master
for over a decade after the mans death. When Bobby himself finally left this veil of tears,
he was buried on an unconsecrated patch of land inside the cemetery gates and to this
very day you can hear Bobby’s disembodied bark in the graveyard, with some passersby
even claiming to see the deceased dog. Arguably the most famous ghost in the graveyard
is that of George McKenzie, a renowned barrister and law writer. McKenzies body lies in a large
black mausoleum inside the cemetary and countless reports of malicious pltergeist like activity
have been reported around it over the years, with some people even claiming to be knocked
to the ground by the troublesome spirit. There’s a story from the 90’s that a homeless
man broke into the mausoleum looking for shelter. When inside, the man decided to indulge in
a a sport of grave robbing, forcing open a number of coffins in the structure looking
for valuables. When he cam to McKenzie’s coffin however, it’s said that before he
could open it, a sinkhole appeared beneath him and the pilfering pauper was dropped into
a pit filled with the bones of plague victims that had been tossed into a mass grave.
Seeing as the victim in this instance was something of a despicable criminal himself,
we can chalk that up as a rare good deed from the grumpy ghost of George McKenzie.

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